ayehandsome:

onlythroughyou:

ayehandsome:

Well Hello, Handsome

Ummm no. Why u got hairy legs bitch. No. No. This half man half woman shit is enough. I don’t fucking get y’all.

Lawd, the ignorance is strong with this one. Letting my body do what it does naturally makes me ALL woman.Thank you. 
trnscndnt:

Elastique
Jennifer Abessira
laughing-trees:

thirdbirdofrhiannon:

Spirit Quartz (also known as the Cactus Quartz) envelopes one in love. It immediately activates and opens the crown chakra. It opens one to self-forgiveness, self-love, and a feeling that “everything’s alright!” in the sense that the universal truth is Love itself, and brings awareness that we are destined for that Love, and do indeed exist in that Love right now. It gives one a feeling of “bubbling over” with abundance. Spirit Quartz is also known for: cleansing and activating other crystals, use in dreaming, astral projection, and visioning. [x]

thhis is beautiful

baby's first words

  • baby: d-d-da..
  • father: daddy?
  • baby: dada /ˈdɑːdɑː/ or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde in the early 20th century. Many claim Dada began in Zurich, Switzerland in 1916, spreading to Berlin shortly thereafter but the height of New York Dada was the year before, in 1915.[1] To quote Dona Budd's The Language of Art Knowledge,
  • Dada was born out of negative reaction to the horrors of World War I. This international movement was begun by a group of artists and poets associated with the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich. Dada rejected reason and logic, prizing nonsense, irrationality and intuition. The origin of the name Dada is unclear; some believe that it is a nonsensical word. Others maintain that it originates from the Romanian artists Tristan Tzara's and Marcel Janco's frequent use of the words "da, da," meaning "yes, yes" in the Romanian language. Another theory says that the name "Dada" came during a meeting of the group when a paper knife stuck into a French-German dictionary happened to point to 'dada', a French word for 'hobbyhorse'.[2]
  • The movement primarily involved visual arts, literature, poetry, art manifestoes, art theory, theatre, and graphic design, and concentrated its anti-war politics through a rejection of the prevailing standards in art through anti-art cultural works. In addition to being anti-war, Dada was also anti-bourgeois and had political affinities with the radical left.

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desert-dreamer:

April Zanne Johnson